Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
CNBC 8
CSPAN2 8
CSPAN 4
MSNBCW 2
FBC 1
MSNBC 1
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
big shoes to follow. the party respects women across america. that is why it gives me great pleasure to reward one of the greatest females with the beacon award. it was created to give an award to an outstanding democrat who exemplifies the ideals and values. in 2009, it was awarded to jimmy carter. it went to state senator and the majority leader. last year's award went to tom harkin. this year's award has gone to secretary hillary clinton. [applause] i have with me on stage some north iowa democratic women with me hereto except the award on senator clinton -- secretary clinton's behalf. on january 21, 2009, hillary rodham clinton was sworn in as secretary of the united states. secretary clinton joined the state department after nearly four decades as an advocate, attorney, first lady, and senator. she attended local public schools before graduating from wellesley college, where she met bill clinton. she married bill clinton and became a successful attorney while also raising chelsea. she was an assistant professor at the university of arkansas law school, and she was appointed by j
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
, they are trying to place in america in the important role of history. this is where they would have dinner. they would have a chance to meet one another, conversed socially and casually, and then they might be invited to dine in the dining room. after supper, the ladies would then adjourn back into the drawing room. maybe they would serve some coffee and tea. this was the social center of the house. if you were an invited guest of the madisons or part of the intimate circle of family or friends, you would be invited into the dining room from the drawing room. and here, dolly madison would in an unusual setting for the timeframe set at the head of the table and her husband, james, would sit at the center of the table. dolly would direct in, it -- with direct the conversation and james would be able to engage in intimate conversation with the people immediately to his right and left. this table today is that for eight people, but there could be as many as 20 people served in the dining room. that would not be unusual. and indeed, dolly madison considered dining at maag pier to be so much mor
exposure to europe, china, latin america. you know i think europe and china are turning, one of the reasons why the euro is so strong for europe term. as for latin america, bud's business has been held back by the weakness in brazil. i know brazil's troubled, but i don't think that weakness is going to last. the world cup comes to brazil in 2014 followed by the olympics in 2016. i think you're going to believe those are going to be pretty darn good for beer sales. bud sells for 17.4 times next year's earnings estimates, gets fair priced considering all the good things going this company's way. although, of course, obviously like everybody else, like it on a pullback. here's one. this is what the crowd drinks in summit, molson coors, tap, i see it similar to bud but with less international exposure and a stock run up further. specifically 18% year-to-date. that's why i'm saying that bud has more room to run because it's well behind this one. and certainly well behind this one, although, this one is an up and comer. suppose you want something stronger than beer, though, then the pick is very
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
call minds in america is set to join us tonight. we're going to ask larry sabato about what's wrong with the deck kratz today. hillary clinton's presidential chnss and get a look at the big new online course and all about the legacy of john f. kennedy. all of those stories and more coming up on "the kudlow report" coming up right now. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." the federal reserve minutes. did they tell us anything? steve liesman joins us in jackson hole. >> good evening, larry, from jackson hole where the fed is gathering. they're gathering without ben bernanke and mario draghi. the fed is releasing its minutes from the july meeting in which it showed no clear intention as to the tapering in september. the committee is split with a few members saying the fed should be patient before tapering. there was not enough economic data and a few members saying the fed should stick to the plan announced in june. quote, it might soon be time to taper. almost all of the participants were pretty comfortable with the june guidance which said that t
of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. fate are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we saw a. it is directly related to our credibility and whether country still believe the united states when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they too can put the world at greater risk. make no mistake. in an increasingly complicated world of sectarian and religious extremist violence, what we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murderer like the shark assad can gas thousands of his people with impunity even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it there will be no end to the test of hours of the dangers that will flow from those others who believe that they can do as t
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
, and what i often call apartheid in the southern part of the united states of america. so if you look at was going on from 1876 to 1895, in that 20 year period we saw the beginning of the end of full citizenship of african-americans in this country. so by the time robert smalls died in 1950, he died brokenhearted, and financially, not near as well off as he once was. and so i have spent a lot of time talking about the history of this. as i used to say to my students when i taught, if it happened before it can happen again. and we see all the speculation about what the supreme court is going to do with the most important civil rights act, which i think was the voting rights act of 1965. and most experts think that that's about to come to a significant, and i call, a noble end. oh grams of affirmative action, that simply means you're going to take positive steps. you can't be passive. you've got to take positive steps to overcome the current effects of past discrimination, the history. not going to happen by itself. if you bring that to a close, and people are speculating that that is a
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> labor day just a couple of weeks away. we're firing up the barbecue because it's cookout week here on "mad money." and you know what, this cookout really couldn't have come at a better time. with the market feeling like it's ready to take a bit of a breather, you might want to side l up to more defensive stocks. perhaps in the spirit of what liquor can do for you. last night, i told you about the healthy organic food i'll be grilling up. you can't have a barbecue with nothing more than just tofu and soy milk. the key ingredient to any cookout is brewskis. and looking like we've got a burgeoning red hot bull market in the beer stocks. in the first four weeks ending on the 3rd, beer sales up 3.8%. that's a huge acceleration from the 1.8% increase in the pre
the world attended it. it was really a time for america to shine and to show that it was coming into its own as a world power. guest: mrs. grant loved it. she bought two things for the white house from there -- one was a shield that showed characters from milton's "paradise lost." then she bought a more endearing piece -- she hated the old james monroe centerpiece with mirrors on it -- she bought a hiawatha centerpiece, which was about this big, and it shows a canoe in the middle and hiawatha lounging on a bearskin rug. that was the new centerpiece for the white house. she bought it there on exhibit. it is still in the silver closet at the white house. host: on twitter -- who were the first lady's staff at this point in the process? guest: there was no social secretary then. usually the ladies got together and filled out the blanks for invitations. it was president and mrs. grant and the honorable blank and blank. their friends would come over for tea party and they would fill out the blanks. she had mary mueller as the housekeeper. is that the one who traveled to europe with her? guest: i
not? >> got to go in. >> come on rob, get it in there to get three points. >> one point. >> america is still learning the beautiful game. >> that will help. >> coming up next, economist dr. jeffe jeffery sacks joins us and bill bratton and nbc political director chuck todd. >> chuck winked at you. >> oh, god. >> wink again. >> the winker. >> he just did. >> and, of course, the great andrea mitchell. >> she's great. >> "morning joe" back in a moment. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping i'to guard their manhood with trnew depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com wit's hard to find contractors with the passion and the skill, and that's why we use angie's list. online or on the phone, we help you hire right the first time with honest reviews on over 720 local services. i want it done right. i don't want to have to worry about it or have to come back and redo it. with angie's list, i was able to turn my home into the home of my dreams. for
a lot of inconsistencinconsistenc. in the americas, things are going pretty well as they are in northern europe. in southern europe, not as well. in japan, where cisco was doing very well last year, now they have some tough comparisons. also in the rest of asia, it is just a mixed bag. china is an area where cisco continues to have trouble. ceo john chambers said on the conference call cisco is committed to delivering on the financial targets they set, like gross margins being above 60%, like earnings growing faster than revenue in most quarters, well managed businesses do that, he said. and therefore that necessitates the making of the cuts so they are able to roll with the punches and the changes in this environment. he also said that cisco is taking too long to make decisions. he's going to cut out some layers that are slowing cisco down. but the stock tumbled at one point more than 10% after hours. if that is indeed where the stock opens later today, it will be back to the levels where it was back in may. guys, back to you. >> here is a quick look at cisco shares in germany, off by s
. and deutsche telekom warning of a profit slowdown in 2013 and looking toward north america for growth. where are the opportunities for this particular sector. we'll talk about that at 11:50 central european time. hope you had your pens and pencils ready. you can find us on e-mail as usual, worldwide@cnbc.com. and you can as per usual find us on twitter. but, again, just coming back to one of the stories breaking on our wires, we're hearing that there has been a quake in western japan. no tsunami warning issued according to dow jones news wires quoting media and magnitude of 2.3 is the magnitude of this quake in western japan. again, no tsunami warning issued. >>> let's move on, though, because china's trading activity in july has given new hope that mainland growth is stabilizing. exports climbed by around 5%. imports surging almost 11%. both figures were a lot better than analysts estimates. the rebound comes as a surprise given china's lackluster trade performance in the past couple of months. that's after authorities clamped down on illegal cash transfers disguised as trade deals. joining
in the pool of daca applicants. those from central america, asia and europe on the other hand are underrepresented in the pool of applicants so far and for these three groups this underrepresentation is also statistically significant. so just a reminder here i'm going through sort of the top line findings and this discussion hopefully will unpack some of the receipts why. okay. so we can move beyond national origins and this is where i do apologize because this should have been removed because this is all about stroking academic ego but this is just a multivariant regression analysis. this is a way to take all of the data, analyze the data while controlling for other factors. now, underrepresentation is one thing and new or bolstered outreach to those particular national origin groups can correct that underrepresentation but are all groups experiencing daca sort of equally? well another way we can address that question it look at denials. so when we think about approvals versus denials, we can ask ourselves, are any particular groups disproportionately being denied? so this ma
-interest in america's cultural war. she writes on family, feminism, homosexuality, affirmative action and campus political correctness. she helped publish a book entitled radical and chief which was exposing obama's lost years that nobody knows
by 3.4%. it was hit by natural catastrophes, bad weather essentially, in north america. but also in europe. net profit missing expectations for the second quarter, and companies also pretty cautious about its outlook. last but not least, i want to show you what is happening in the currency space. sterling dollar at a two-month high, sitting at 155.78. getting closer and closer to that 156 level. this is on the back of better -- much stronger than expected retail sales for the month of july. certainly benefitting from that heat wave we have been seeing in the uk. euro dollar pretty resilient at 132.82, back below the 133 level. and dollar yen seeing a little bit of softness at 98.07. this is because the finance minister in japan pretty much quashed hopes of that cut in the corporate tax rate and this is what the markets had been hoping for. so we are seeing some yen strength. and on the back of that, we are seeing declines, pretty big ones, actually, in the nikkei 225. back over to you guys. >> thanks very much, carolin. becky, are you still looking? >> looking for some of these.
there you go. we've tallied the results, and you said it, america. mike murphy, the bear on google won the debate, although you may -- >> i commend our viewers for their charitable bets. >> final trades. >> memory research. >> buy citi. >> buy apple. >> nice, 1:00 exactly. "power lunch" starts now. >> "halftime" is over. the second half of your trading day begins now. >> nailed it. 1:00 on the button. stocks are steady following last week's sell-off but there are new fears about the emerging markets. is there still opportunity out there or is your money better off here in the u.s. with tapering right around the corner? >>> a big week for retail earnings, folks. the sector is up about 25% so far this year. and we will tell you the one thing, the one thing that is defining the retail winners and losers, and it will surprise you. and may actually make you a little queasy when you find out. >>> and the wildfires out west, huge, fast-growing blaze sparking mandatory evacuations in idaho. sun valley, that is the area that is apparently most at risk out there. we are going to go there for
. their time. it was bank of america's time before and now it is one of the moments when i look back at my own career and i realize that i had a choice, goldman sachs coming out of harvard law or paul weiss. i took goldman, but it is a paul weiss moment. law firm. i'm going law firm. >> you covered a lot of this when you talked to jamie here on the very floor a few weeks ago. >> yes. >> take a look at this bite. >> this company did great through the crisis, and we trade around the world and trade tr trillions of dollars everyday. we are a good company with flaws. >> you are used past tense. >> yes, there is some compliance and some mortgage and some industry-wide and some unique to us, ap when nd when we looked ae said they were accurate complaints. so we acknowledge the faults and we will fix them. we are not denying it, and we will fix them and make the regulators happy with what we are doing. >> look, a lot of blame to go around and a lot of people hate the bankers, and do you read the store ri and say, boy, i feel bad for jpmorgan and dimon, wow, what a shame. no, you don't. they are big t
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)